K is for Kibitzer

GifsKibitzer

Clockwork Nessie, Part 9

Wait a minute. I jumped into their banter. “A monster in Loch Ness? Near Dog Island? Who saw this creature, Thomas?”

“’Twere Mrs. Fairfax, the baker’s sister. She said she were out early on her way to the bakery, and as she passed by Dog Island, she saw the monster lift its terrible head. It stopped and looked right through her, then slipped back under. Never made a sound, almost like it were a shade.”

“Don’t believe him, Miss, he’s full of fables, this one.” Sarah gave Thomas a friendly nudge in the arm that elicited a sly smile from the man.

Had I overheard their conversation on the way to the shore, I’d have dismissed it as the idle chatter of a man trying to impress his girl. The note had mentioned Dog Island, one of two small islands in Loch Ness. Had Papa made more than one creature?

“I think I’d like to visit Dog Island. Do you think you could arrange it for me, Thomas?”

He regarded me with new interest. “Aye, I can row you over today if you like, but why would you want to go there, Miss? It’s naught but an old hunting lodge, only used in early Fall.”

“And don’t forget the monster lying in wait to eat you if you get too close.” Sarah lifted a coquettish brow.

(To Be Continued) a2z-2013-badge-001_5bmed5d

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4 thoughts on “K is for Kibitzer

  1. Ok, first off, I didn’t know people, besides me, still used ‘Kibitzing’.
    Second, I love your accent writing. You used a lot of great ‘tags’ without resorting to dropped letters and apostrophes. Were, terrible, aye, this one. As a reader, I can hear the accent in the word choice.
    I might have used nary instead of never, but that’s just me. And I love the tongue clucking that the Scottish use as words to, like T’ch, or a’ch. (sp?). My great grandmother used to call us “Wee bairns” and serve us tea in demitasse cups. cream and sugar first, and properly steeped, of course. 😉

    • Thanks, Dale! Ya know, from my VERY brief travels there, and my viewing of UK movies and tv shows, I could hear the voice in my head, but I can’t honestly say it was Scottish vs. British. LOL I find true Scottish brogue very difficult to read if an author is really trying to be authentic. Sounds like you agree that a little goes a long way with the written word. I never “get” the Scottish work “kin” or however it’s spelled for the word “know” without having to stop and substitute “know” in my head.

      And Kibitzer…I must confess to pulling out the old thesaurus for that as I needed a K word to convey the gist of this segment. So, methinks you may still be a lone wolf for that one. 🙂

  2. From Dale Long (migrated from free wordpress blog):
    Ok, first off, I didn’t know people, besides me, still used ‘Kibitzing’.
    Second, I love your accent writing. You used a lot of great ‘tags’ without resorting to dropped letters and apostrophes. Were, terrible, aye, this one. As a reader, I can hear the accent in the word choice.
    I might have used nary instead of never, but that’s just me. And I love the tongue clucking that the Scottish use as words to, like T’ch, or a’ch. (sp?). My great grandmother used to call us “Wee bairns” and serve us tea in demitasse cups. cream and sugar first, and properly steeped, of course. 😉

    My response:
    Thanks, Dale! Ya know, from my VERY brief travels there, and my viewing of UK movies and tv shows, I could hear the voice in my head, but I can’t honestly say it was Scottish vs. British. LOL I find true Scottish brogue very difficult to read if an author is really trying to be authentic. Sounds like you agree that a little goes a long way with the written word. I never “get” the Scottish work “kin” or however it’s spelled for the word “know” without having to stop and substitute “know” in my head.

    And Kibitzer…I must confess to pulling out the old thesaurus for that as I needed a K word to convey the gist of this segment. So, methinks you may still be a lone wolf for that one. 🙂

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